Flowers, Weeding, BOB, and Sully Too

 

As the summer progresses more flowers have started to show their colorful faces. Although this year they are a bit on the short side. All the cool, cloudy, wet days have slowed their roll. The ones that do bloom are cute and pretty.

This was the first little petunia this year. It was hidden a bit by the weed grass.

 

This small white cosmos was in the same area.

 

This was an orange California poppy.

This small common poppy.

 

Several different colored cosmos.

 

The Bachelor Buttons will not be out done.

 

Two Pretty in Pink Poppies
It always seem that when the poppies bloom they look there best on a windy day.
I have to hold them but that still didn’t keep the petals from swaying in the wind.

 

The first golden tickseed.
It was already starting to fade from being wind blown.

 

The second little petunia after that bed was weeded.

 

This flower is one that was a late bloomer last year. Also it may have been late because when things were first sprouting I thought it was a weed. Once the weeds got taller I did not see it. So a lone field larkspur plant with purple flowers survived last year.

 

This year I again sprinkled this same wildflower mixture. I again was pulling this plant as a weed when things were first sprouting. Somehow this guy hid himself away amongst the taller weeds from my grabby little fingers this year.
I again have a lone forking, rocket, or field larkspur plant but this year the flowers are pink. I was also able to get better photos as he is right along the edge next to the railroad tie border.

 

My final flower is not an on purpose flower. It is actually that carrot I let go wild.

It has gotten quite tall and has several branches with many flower heads.
It has many insect visitors including this busy bumble bee.
I had a heck of a time just getting the three shots of her.

 

Now on to the weeding.
I weeded the west side of the deck bed. That is why I was able to find the second petunia a few days later.

 

I got the south bedroom window bed weeded too.

 

The can peppers and the south side of the shed were weed also.

 

 

 

 

David decided to take the water heater out of BOB. He said once he got to looking at it, that he thinks this was a replacement heater. He doesn’t think it was properly hooked back up as there were wires that were not even hooked in to the heater at all. (see photo below for wires)

The water heater removed and some of the copper tubing.

 

David eventually wants to put one of those electric tankless water heaters in BOB. We don’t really need hot water at this point. We don’t need it for showers since we took out the tub/shower and will be taking those at campsites and RV parks that provide showers. We can just boil water on the portable camp stove for doing dishes for now.
He also removed all the extra copper tubing (as you can see it is laying on the ground in the above photo of the water heater) for the propane that went to it ,the furnace and the refrigerator. Those have also been removed in previous remodels. After he got the tubing out he was able to find some end caps at ACE hardware to seal off the ends.
Now that all the extra propane lines were capped off, David wanted to make sure the propane tank worked properly and still provided gas to the stove and oven in BOB. The propane system is in proper working order. David was afraid that he may have to remove the tank and figure out a different propane system for the stove and oven.
Wooooo Hoooo! I don’t need to use the camp stove for boiling water or cooking. I also now have a working oven to cook in. Nick was glad that the oven works too. He wants me to be able to make my cheesy rice dish.

 

I was able to get BOB’s bedroom back in order.

 

I will finish off this post with Sully pouncing on one of the bijillion grasshoppers we have this year.

 

 

And Now back to Our Regular October Weather

 

The weather has decided it will be a bit more seasonable. I have been able to get a few things done in the yard and garden area.

I was able to roll up a couple of garden hoses.

 

The flowers are all done for now. I think they may have actually made it a bit longer if they had not been covered with that heavy wet snow earlier.

 

Even so a couple of petunias were still green and had a flower. They were still green as of yesterday(October 25). The alyssum was and is still green and flowering. It is a tough little plant. Its seed survived a whole year before sprouting late this year. Now it just wants to keep going.Β  πŸ˜€

 

Even though the temperature got down to 16 degrees a couple of nights these hearty bugs came back in force when the temperature got back up to near 70’s. This is a typical October occurance, the swarming of the box elder bugs. This was a mild swarming this day. They can sometimes be in groups of 20 or more all over the outside walls.

They are everywhere and get in the house. It gives Little Kitty something to chase around the house. She will bap them around, pick them up in her mouth, discover they taste awful and spit them out. Then repeat the whole process when she forgets how awful they taste.

 

The other task I was able to complete was getting the gladiolus bulbs dug up and ready for winter storage.

 

You may have notice the leaves in the flower beds. I plan to leave them on the wild flowers and petunias until spring. I did it that way last year and all the petunias and cosmos that self seeded came up this spring. Nature’s free mulch.

I will clean out the marigolds though. They seem to do fine with out a mulching if they self seed. I know this because the little buggers pop up everywhere the next spring, even outside the beds in bare spots in the grass.Β  πŸ˜€

I Think I Know What Some of My Wildflowers Are Now

And New Flower Photos for The Week Ending September 15, 2018

 

David bought some more boxes of the wildflower mix so I was able to get the names of the flowers in it. I had to take to the internets to find the common names as the scientific names were given on the box.

These areΒ  Calendula Officinalis -pot marigolds .

 

These little yellow and orange ones are Coreopsis Tinctoria – golden tickseed.

 

The ones I was calling impatiens were actually a poppy variety.

The smaller ones are Papaver Rhoeas – common, rose, corn field, flander’s or red poppy.

 

The larger poppies are Eschscholzia californica– california poppy.

 

These are Rudbeckia Hirta – black-eyed Susan which are in the sunflower family.

 

This late bloomer was Cynoglussum Amabile – Chinese forget-me-not or hound’s-tongue.

 

The other late bloomer was Delphinium Consolida – forking,rocket or field larkspur.

 

I had no problem identifying the cosmos or the bachelor buttons. The tiny white flowers you see in a lot of the photos turned out to be baby’s breath.

 

The new flower photos for the week ending September 15, 2018.

I Found Some Late Bloomers, Big Leaves, A Bee, A Beetle, Patterns, Peppers, and Plums

 

 

I was out watering the flowers on August 31 when I noticed two different patches of purple and a patch of small blue flowers down low among the taller flowers’ greenery. I got down for a closer look, they were all new varieties that had not bloomed before. So the next day I took out my camera to get these photos.

 

My coleus, Cleo is doing so awesome. She has gotten so tall and look how huge her leaves are! I took these photos showing the size and the beautiful tricolor of her leaves.

I don’t know if I will be able to bring her into the house this year, I don’t think I have a pot big enough. I wonder if I cut her down close to the ground and mulch her really good if she would survive the winter ? Oh, and then put an empty wall o’ water around that. Any other suggestions would be helpful.Β  πŸ˜€

 

Sully asked to go out on Wednesday(September 5th). I got my garden jacket on and put the garden scissors and camera in the pocket. I put his harness on him and out the door we went on this cool morning. As I was going down the deck steps I noticed a nice bloom of the white with pink trim cosmos. I got my camera out and ready, by that time the flower had a visitor on it. What luck, I had tried to get a photo of a bumble bee on the flowers the other day but she was a bit flighty in the warm afternoon. This was a nice cool morning so she was a bit slow. I was able to get pretty close. I tried to get one more really super close but I must have touched her with the lens, so she flew away. I didn’t bother her again when she landed again. I don’t need an angry be wanting to sting me.

 

 

I was walking over to the east shed bed to pick some peppers when I noticed this in the corner of the bed. The other gladiolus canes were finished weeks ago. I thought this one might cane, but was not positive as it was small and skinny.

 

I continued over to the pepper plants, I began moving leaves around looking for peppers. I was expecting to find two peppers that were ready to pick. I was surprised to find three more.

 

Sully was all settled by the deck so I went over and turned on the water hose to begin watering. I was just about to start when I noticed this sitting on a marigold. I am pretty sure he is not a beneficial bug to the garden. I believe he is some kind of pine beetle.

After doing some research on the internets I was able to determine that it is a Monochamus notatus, the northeastern pine sawyer or notable sawyer. I was correct that they can be a pest. It is not surprising to find them around our area, we do have the Nebraska National Forest all around us. The information below was provided by Wikipedia.

Monochamus is a genus of longhorn beetles found throughout the world. They are commonly known as sawyer beetles or sawyers, as their larvae bore into dead or dying trees, especially conifers[1] such as pines. They are the type genus of the Monochamini, a tribe in the huge long-horned beetle subfamily Lamiinae, but typically included in the Lamiini today.

If sawyer beetles infect freshly cut pine logs, they can cause a 30–40% loss in value due to the tunnels their larvae bore. It’s important to process logs within a few weeks of cutting or store them in water to minimize damage.[2] Some species are known to transport phoretic Bursaphelenchus nematodes, including B. xylophilus which causes pine wilt disease.[3]

 

After noticing the beetle, I started noticing some really cool patterns in many of the other marigolds. I took these photos of the more dramatic ones.

 

Do you remember that bunch of asylum that surprised me in the west bedroom window flower bed? Well it is finally blooming now. It is just full of these tiny white flowers.

 

The wild plums that grow along some of fence line with the horse pasture have produce a good crop this year. The bushes along the county road and the top of the driveway are just bursting with plums. This is just a small bush that grows outside the back door of the house.

I was able to lean over the fence to pick this one that was within my reach. You can see here they are not as big or the same colors as the commercial kind you buy in a store. I don’t think they are good for just eating right off the bush. They are probably more suited for jam or jelly.

My Favorite Flower Photos for the Week Ending August 18th

 

My all time favorite photo is this one. I have been trying to get a shot of one all summer. The pink part sun fades really fast or the petals start to get beat up before I get a chance to take a photo.

 

The last two gladiolus canes have finally bloomed.

This was the only one of the new bulbs that toughed it out to sprout.

A white one with a pink hue.

 

The other one was a nice red.

I like the photo of it closed the best.

 

I told you it would not be long for some green bell peppers!

I hope I get lots of peppers.

My squash and cucumber plants were decimated by the evil squash bugs so I only got a few fruits.